‘She Has a Name’ illustrates film making with a great purpose.

She Has a Name, the 2016 Canadian drama by the Kooman brothers, was released in the UK this month and will be shown at selected cinemas across the country during the coming weeks. The film’s primary focus is the harrowing story of two young girls who become victims of trafficking in Thailand. The film highlights the level of human trafficking, the height of corruption and the power businessmen yield from such a despicable activity. Please click on the link to read my review  of the film for Occhi Magazine.

 

Soul of A Nation- Celebrating African American Artists Contribution to Art and History

Soul of a Nation shines a bright light on the vital contribution of black artists to a dramatic period in American art and history.

The show opens in 1963 at the height of the Civil Rights movement and its dreams of integration. In its wake emerged more militant calls for Black Power: a rallying cry for African American pride, autonomy and solidarity, drawing inspiration from newly independent African nations.

Artists responded to these times by provoking, confronting, and confounding expectations. Their momentum makes for an electrifying visual journey. Vibrant paintings, powerful murals, collage, photography, revolutionary clothing designs and sculptures made with Black hair, melted records, and tights – the variety of artworks reflects the many viewpoints of artists and collectives at work during these explosive times.

Some engage with legendary figures from the period, with paintings in homage to political leaders Martin Luther King, Malcolm X and Angela Davis, musician John Coltrane and sporting hero Jack Johnson. Muhammad Ali is here in Andy Warhol’s famous painting. An original Sugar Shack painting by Ernie Barnes – known as a Marvin Gaye album cover – leaves the US for the first time.

Spanning the emergence of Black feminism, debates over the possibility of a unique Black aesthetic in photography, and including activist posters as well as purely abstract works, the exhibition asks how the concept of Black Art was promoted, contested and sometimes flatly rejected by artists across the United States.

With most of the 150 artworks on display in the UK for the first time, the exhibition introduces more than 50 exceptional American artists, including influential figures Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, Lorraine O’Grady and Betye Saar, among numerous others. This landmark exhibition is a rare opportunity to see era-defining artworks that changed the face of art in America.

SOUL OF A NATION: ART IN THE AGE OF BLACK POWER

Soul of A Nation- Art in the Age of Black Power runs at the Tate Modern from 1st July to 22nd October. For  further information please visit  the Tate’s website 

 

East Street Arts- A Social Enterprise Success Story

East Street Arts
East Street Arts

In recent months I’ve been working in the finance and lending sector. In the present financial climate, many small businesses and social enterprises are struggling to get off the ground due to a lack of support from high street banks. This is a particular concern for the arts sector, arguably made worse by the UK’s imminent departure from the EU. Fortunately there are alternative lending channels in the form of responsible finance providers (community development finance associations) that service and support the needs of such initiatives. The Key Fund in Sheffield UK is one of these providers. On a visit to one of its events, I was fortunate to meet Nicola Greenan, External Relations Director of East Street Arts. East Street Arts is one of a growing number of beneficiaries of Key Fund financing. Nicola and her colleagues kindly agreed to answer a few questions regarding East Street Arts and its objectives.

How did East Street Arts start?

In 1993, East Street Arts emerged in Leeds with the aim to take reference and inspiration from the rich history of, and current developments within, the artist-led movement. Karen Watson and Jon Wakeman founded the organization on the ideology of the alternative, contesting the place for art and the role of the artist resulted in the initiation of studios, facilities, professional support and public activities.

The first public exhibition took place in 1994 in two temporary empty shop units underneath the railway arches in Leeds city centre.

In 2000 East Street Arts moved to Patrick Studios, the site of St.Patrick’s Social Club – a former boxing club on St.Mary’s Lane in Mabgate. With a capital grant it renovated the building with Leeds architects Baumann Lyons to create 34 custom designed artists studios and facilities.

The business has grown over the last 23 years; working across four permanent venues, eighty temporary and partner spaces across the UK, making use of civic spaces and the public realm, East Street Arts develops new work and positions art within our everyday lives and contexts.

What are the aims and objectives of East Street Arts and how do you aim to achieve them?

Our mission is to focus on the development of artists through our events programme, membership activities, professional development and studio/facility provision.

We aim to support artists to create work and experiences that bring lasting change to our everyday lives; we do this by supporting artists’ creative needs, wellbeing and prosperity and by providing an environment that nurtures creative exploration and collaboration for audiences.

How and who can be a member of this collective?

Anyone can become a member of East Street Arts. The ethos of our membership is about support and exchange. We need member involvement to help us ensure we are meeting member’s needs. We currently have over 300 members, many of which are also studio holders.

Our membership is national and subscription based, the fees represent 1% of our overall income and they and other raised funds directly support:

  • UK and Europe based residency opportunities
  •  Access to facilities, equipment and space
  • One to one tailored professional development sessions
  • Promotional and profile platforms
  • A range of professional development sessions
  • An annual research trip to meet peers in key European city
  • A dedicated members monthly newsletter

How important are your studios in supporting artists and communities?

Studios expose the rich diversity of artists practice, broker new relationships, collaborations and events and play a pivotal role in a city’s cultural and creative identity.

We offer artists affordable, diverse and managed studios based within active and inspiring environments. Over the last twenty years studios have remained a constant and essential part in the work we do in support of artists.

Studio holders are an important part of our community and we work hard to ensure we have the right kind of space. We welcome artists working across art forms and at different stages of their careers.

We currently have over 200 artists and groups working across our range of venues in the UK. In Leeds we host studios at Patrick Studios, Barkston Studios and Union 105, and in Gateshead Old Town Hall. In addition we have a variety of studios within our Temporary Space scheme.

Can you explain the Art Hostel Leeds initiative and how it works?

Art Hostel- Leeds
Art Hostel- Leeds

Art Hostel is the first social enterprise Art Hostel in the UK, leading the way with a brand new concept: a social mission focused on strengthening the local economy by creating new jobs and encouraging income into the area via ethical tourism. Also supporting neighbourhood regeneration on the oldest street in Leeds, Kirkgate, an area earmarked by the city council for repair and reinstatement.

Art Hostel will pioneer a new model for artists to interact with their wider community – aiming to change the way people stay, encouraging visitors to contribute to the city of Leeds while they are here, providing a physical infrastructure to make, create, debate, sleep and explore. The basement project space will host a dynamic, rolling programme of artists events, installations, performances and creative happenings; also, this space can be hired, linking back out into the cultural underbelly of the city.

In terms of differentiating the offer, Art Hostel fulfills local demand – it is currently Leeds’ only year-round, budget-style-stay, offering bespoke accommodation from as little as £22.50 per person, per night in a shared dorm room, or in a choice of private bedroom’s, costing £55 per night, sleeping two.

Also Art Hostel is accessible to anyone – you don’t have to be involved in the creative sector to stay there, making art accessible to those who wish to be involved, but also to those who may not have otherwise chosen to participate, de-mystifying visual arts and discovering new audiences.

You received support from Key Fund, a community development financial lender. There is a lot of debate about the importance of funding for social enterprises at present. How important a part did they play in the success your initiative?

As this was a new business model for us as a charity and we needed to move swiftly to ensure we were ahead of the game, regular funding avenues would have been to lengthy a process. The timing of the project was so vital that gaining finance as quick as we could with a social investor that understood how the organisation operated was key to making the project happen. Without Key Funds support the project would not have happened.

For further information on East Street Arts please visit. http://eaststreetarts.org.uk

For further information on the Art Hostel please visit http://arthostel.org.uk

For further information on The Key Fund and community development finance in the UK

http://responsiblefinance.org.uk

If you’re in the US please visit the following links

https://www.cdfa.net

Jazz Moon- Joe Okonkwo’s Latest Book Captures the Essence of The Harlem Renaissance.

Those of you familiar with Harlem in New York have probably seen it’s transformation over recent years. Walking around the area, you can see a difference from how it was over a decade ago. The area is yet another example of the gentrification of urban environments with increased rents, an array of expensive condos and luxury apartments purchased by upwardly mobile city workers. Of course,  no area of the city should be exempt from developments or regeneration projects if they further the goal of more sustainable communities, benefiting society’s most disadvantaged. However, there is a legitimate concern for generations of local families being forced out of an area full of history, artistic expression and a sense of place. I’m very interested in the many views held by stakeholders and continue to observe how Harlem, as an historically and artistically rich area, benefits from change. This brings my focus to how Harlem is celebrated as an arts and cultural hub by contemporary writers.

Jazz Moon
Jazz Moon

There are numerous resources capturing the essence of the Harlem’s Renaissance, the cultural, social, and artistic explosion that took place  in the 1920s and 30s. The latest  is Joe Okonkwo’s novel Jazz Moon, set against the backdrop of the renaissance and glittering Jazz Age Paris. The novel will be published by Kensington Books this May.

David Ebershoff, author of The Danish Girl and The 19th Wife has called Jazz Moon “A passionate, alive, and original novel about love, race, and jazz in 1920s Harlem and Paris — a moving story of traveling far to find oneself.”

Jazz Moon’s  author Joe Okonkwo is a graduate of the University of Houston with a B.A. in theatre and an MFA in Creative Writing from City College of New York. Joe made his living in theatre for a number of years as an actor, stage manager, director, playwright, and youth theatre instructor.

His short stories have appeared in a variety of print and online venues including Promethean, Penumbra Literary Magazine, Cooper Street, Storychord, LGBTsr.org, Chelsea Station, Shotgun Honey, Best Gay Stories 2015, Rind Literary Magazine, Em Dash Literary Magazine, Best Gay Love Stories 2009, and Keep This Bag Away From Children. His short story “Cleo” has been nominated for a 2015 Pushcart Prize.

Continually fascinated by Harlem’s rich history, I was intrigued to quiz Joe on his perspective and his ability to capture the essence of this notable period of African American history in the book.

Q.What books have most influenced your life?

James Baldwin’s Another Country was a big influence. I read it in high school, but not as part of any curriculum. It was the first gay book I ever read. When I finished it, I was depressed because I had really entered into the world of that book and found other people like me and I didn’t want to leave.

Toni Morrison’s books have been a big part of my life, especially Beloved. Historians and sociologists talk about how black Americans continue to be scarred by the experience of slavery. That was certainly something I believed, but more in a theoretical sense. Then I read Beloved and I saw that it’s not just a theory. Morrison captures the personal side of slavery and how it destructive it was—not just on a grand scale, but on a very personal level. Slavery destroyed individuals. It was a destruction that doesn’t heal easily or quickly. It’s a destruction that filters down the generations. I think Beloved is the most powerful book I’ve ever read because it takes the theoretical and puts human faces on it.

Q .What was the hardest part of writing this book?

JO- Jazz Moon is a historical novel, so making sure I had my facts correct was probably the biggest challenge. Making sure the characters’ language and slang was in keeping with the times. I reference a lot of real songs in the book, so I had to make sure that they had actually been composed by the time Jazz Moon begins (1925). Making sure descriptions are historically accurate.

I think the major challenge for any writer of historical fiction is sure to blending the historical research in to the story in a seamless and creative way. You don’t want the novel to feel like a history book. It’s historical, but still needs to read like fiction. I get extraordinarily irritated when I read historical fiction that feels like I’m reading a chapter from a history book. I do want to be instructed, but I don’t want to feel like I’m being instructed.

Joe Okonkwo Photo by Theik Smith
Joe Okonkwo Photo by Theik Smith

Q. Tell us briefly about your forthcoming book Jazz Moon.

JO- It started as a short story in 2004. It’s set against the backdrop of the Harlem Renaissance and Jazz Age Paris. It’s part coming-out story, part love story, part personal and creative odyssey.

I love the Harlem Renaissance. If I had a time machine and could go back to any era, it would be the Harlem Renaissance. The 1920s were a very difficult time to be black in the United States, but it was a very culturally and politically fruitful time nonetheless. Literature. Art. Broadway. Jazz, of course. And it was during this period that the foundations of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s was laid. It was during the Harlem Renaissance that people—both white and black—realized that black was beautiful and, in terms of Broadway and the recording industry, marketable.

One of the most fascinating aspects of Harlem during that period (and something I focus on extensively in Jazz Moon) was gay life. It was mostly underground, but not completely. There were gay bars and an annual drag ball that was one of the social events of the year. There were places called “buffet flats,” which were the 1920s equivalent of sex clubs. You’d go to a house or an apartment and in each room were “performers” engaged in a different sexual activity. Could be hetero or homo. As an audience member, you selected the rooms and activities that piqued your interest the most, hence the “buffet.”

People were not pro-gay in the way we think of pro-gay in 2016, but they were certainly aware of the gays and mostly took the attitude of live and let live—as long as gays weren’t too open.

Q.Tell us about the book’s protagonists? Was there a real-life inspiration behind Ben Charles and his devoted wife Angeline?

JO- There was not a real-life inspiration behind Ben and Angeline. Jazz Moon is not based on real people. That said, there is absolutely a lot of me in many of the characters, especially Ben. I didn’t realize just how much of me was in these people until I was near the end of the process. Some of the characters are who I am. And some of the characters are who I want to be.

Q. What other real-life inspirations did you draw upon if any?

JO- Jazz Moon is, in part, a coming out story, and Ben suffers greatly during this process. I did draw on my own coming-out experience. I realized I was gay when I was thirteen, denied it like crazy till I was seventeen when I came out to myself, then “formally” came out at age twenty-one. While working on the novel, whenever I hit an emotional roadblock about Ben’s coming-out, I’d delve into my own experience, which was, at times, painful, lonely, and confusing.

Q. Much is being made of the gentrification of Harlem. Since 2000 particularly, the number of historically black, blue collar residents has fallen notably, especially in central Harlem. Whilst capturing the spirit of the renaissance, do you feel Jazz Moon contributes to forwarding the discussion of heritage, sustainable communities or a resistance to change?

JO- I don’t know about sustainable communities and resistance to change. But I would certainly like to think that Jazz Moon can start people thinking about heritage. As I’ve already mentioned, the Harlem Renaissance was a culturally and politically rich period. It’s a period that deserves study and recognition. We’re starting to see some recognition, I’m happy to say. Queen Latifah starred in a biopic about the great blues singer Bessie Smith last year. Audra McDonald is getting ready to open on Broadway in a version of Shuffle Along, which was produced in 1921 and was enormously important in the development of the black Broadway musical. I would be honored if Jazz Moon’s legacy is that it contributes to the continued rediscovery of the Harlem Renaissance.

Q. What are your future projects?

JO- I just finished a short story called “Picnic Street.” The first draft was based very closely on a childhood incident, but in subsequent drafts, the story veered pretty far from that incident. The story just started to write itself, which is exactly what you want: to give in to the story.

I have another short story that’s writing itself in my head right now. It may end up being a novella. I’m not sure yet. It involves politics and love and how (or if) people of differing ideologies can also have a successful relationship.

My next novel will again be set in the Harlem Renaissance, but this time it’s about a real person from the era: Gladys Bentley. She was a pianist and a blues singer and a drag king. She was known for wearing a white tux and white top hat and performing at a gay Harlem club called The Clam House. She would dirty up the lyrics of popular songs and flirt with women in the audience. She claimed to have married a white woman in an Atlantic City ceremony, but no one knows the identity of this woman. In the 1950s, Bentley gave an interview to Ebony magazine, renouncing her lesbianism and claiming that taking female hormones had “cured” her. She had an amazing, entrancing voice. She makes a cameo appearance in Jazz Moon and my protagonist is hypnotized by that voice.

There’s still so much to know and learn about the Harlem Renaissance. I’m not done with it yet.

Q. What advice would you give to young enthusiastic writers?

JO- READ. Read everything. Literary fiction. Genre fiction. Thrillers. Biographies. History. Read the news. Read politics. I’m a political junkie. I read up on political affairs every day and I’ve found that reading politics makes my fiction writing stronger. Political writers have to get to the point, get the facts across, and accomplish that in a way that’s engaging and keeps the reader reading. That’s valuable for a fiction writer. But to the main question: just read. Stephen King says that if you don’t have the time to read, then you don’t have the time or the tools to write.

I thank Joe for his interview and wish him well with his book. For further info please visit http://www.joeokonkwo.com

The Pendleton Trade Blanket: Celebrating Culture and Art

Occasionally I have guest bloggers writing on subjects related to art or architecture. I was approached by Jessica Kane of Indian Traders to talk about the increasing popularity of Indian Trade blankets which I find very interesting. Jessica Kane is a native Californian who has always had an interest in arts & crafts, DIY projects, and other handmade products. Her favorite stores are Joann and Michael’s. When she’s not creating items, she writes professionally. She currently writes for Indian Traders, a leading vendor of Pendleton blankets and jewelry located in Glibert, Arizona. Their Pendleton blankets are wool blankets that are a combination of beauty, quality, and durability. The jewellery is designed by Native American artists from the Navajo, Hopi, Zuni, and other pueblos of the Rio Grande.

The Pendleton Trade Blanket as Cultural Art

pendleton blankets
pendleton blankets

Trade blankets have been a part of the culture of Native Americans since the first European traders brought brightly colored wool blankets over on ships. Those blankets were made specially for the trade with the natives. The ‘trade blanket’, as they were often called, would feature bright and interesting color combinations not possible with traditional robes made of animal hide or local materials. The blankets woven by hand were not as intricately woven as those made by a machine. Soon the European machine-made blanket would replace the traditional robes.

Long History

Traditional hide or plant fiber robes were not just worn for warmth. Robes were decorated with symbols signifying many things of importance. So-called wearing blankets of the western Native Americans were often made of highly prized buffalo hide. Some groups such as the Navajo used hand-woven textile made of local plant fibers or even wool. They were dyed with natural pigments. The end results were beautiful. But the muted natural shades and coarser hand woven fabric did not have the same visual impact as the new trade blankets. Over a period of time, even the stately buffalo hide robes were replaced with vibrant and highly detailed Pendleton trade blankets.

Eventually the trade blanket would become known as a robe. Historically, the term robe had only been used to describe a buffalo hide garment. While the trade blanket was sometimes used as bedding, it was most often worn as an outer garment. While it was first called a robe while being sold to European-American buyers, the label is more accurate.

Pendleton’s Approach

The earliest Indian trade blankets made by Pendleton were very different from other trade blankets. A talented weaver by the name of Joe Rawnsley went to the tribes in northwest Oregon. He asked them what they would like to see in a blanket. Using their suggestions for colors and design, he helped to create a uniquely native blanket. These newly designed blankets sold extremely well. Joe Rawnsley went next to the tribes of the Southwest to create new designs for them. The hundreds of ideas that he returned with formed the basis of the new trade blanket design.

The trade in Pendleton blankets started with the Nez Perce nation. It soon spread to all the southwest tribes such as the Navajo, the Zuni and the Hopi nations. The people wore them with pride. Soon the blankets were valuable as both everyday and ceremonial garb. The Pendleton blankets were just sold to the natives by the company, at first. Some patterns and color combinations were more valued than others by those using them. The American Indian tribes traded and gifted their favorites among themselves.

Advanced Loom Technology

Pendleton Blanket
Pendleton Blanket

The Pendleton trade blankets were woven on Jacquard looms. These extremely advanced looms used a series of punched cards to control the thousands of strands that would make up a single blanket. The Jacquard loom was key in creating the many complex designs that were otherwise impossible to weave. The woven designs are reversible, with either felt bound or fringed ends. They often feature a light side and a darker side with bright highlights.

Cultural Pride

American Indian cultures of the west have long used the gifting of ornately woven colorful wool blankets as a way to mark the passage of important events and life celebrations. Many are worn at powwow gatherings to mark belonging to a tribe. Women wear smaller shawls while the men don a blanket while dancing and celebrating.

A Prized Gift

An important cultural item, a gift of a blanket holds high meaning. During powwows the important members at the gathering will often give gifts of Pendleton blankets. These gifts are given in thanks to those who selected such people as the powwow chairmen, the directors or the head singers and dancers. While there are many types of gifts given, the Pendleton trade blanket is the most highly prized.

While the heavy wool or cotton blankets are quite warm, they have much more meaning than just utilitarian use. When given as a gift the Pendleton blanket symbolizes respect, friendship and gratitude. It is a symbol of belonging to a people with a long and proud tradition outside mainstream American life. The emotions felt by those wearing them and symbolism shown to others are part of the “language of the blanket”. It’s what makes the Pendleton trade blanket such a part of American Indian cultural past and present.

The trade blankets have always been woven on machine looms, often by non-Indian people. But these blankets are a part of American Indian culture as the powwow itself. Because of the care taken to work with the tribes from the beginning, these blankets are unique in the cultural consciousness. They serve as a visual statement of belonging to a native people. This is true both within the native cultures and in the greater American cultural consciousness. While the old trade blankets started out in traditional European plaids and block-woven colors, the increasing use of native designs made the blanket uniquely American Indian.

Modern Art

Today finds the Pendleton trade blanket as prized as ever. As the last remaining Indian blanket maker, Pendleton is proud to work with native groups to create new designs. Such traditional designs as the Chief Joseph line feature colors and patterns from the very earliest Pendleton blankets. These are the designs most often given as gifts.

Pendleton Woolen Mills continues to create new Native American designs. Some newer patterns are based on natural phenomena such as early morning in the mountains or the swirl of colors in the arctic sky. The newer Indian designs celebrate the wheel of life and many other traditional motifs. Just as the older patterns were designed for various tribes to enjoy, the newer ones are also made to celebrate different traditions and peoples. Today the motifs are often created by the very people who they celebrate.

There is no parallel in any culture to the uniquely American art that is the Pendleton trade blanket. The designs and colors have been on the radar of the high fashion industry off and on over the decades. Most recently, the Pendleton fabrics were featured in everything from coats to work boots. Today the blankets themselves are valued by many outside of the Native American community for their design, durability and high quality.

 

I thank Jessica for her educational and thought provoking blog entry. For further information please contact indiantraders com

Arts and Diversity: Talent Is Everywhere but is Opportunity ?

This week I found the subjects of a black boycott of the Oscars and UK black actors furthering their careers overseas quite interesting. Fundamentally, the Oscars are meant to celebrate high quality filmmaking, irrespective of ethnicity. Historically, Hollywood has had a problem representing people who aren’t white Americans or European. Moreover, one questions how the Academy celebrates the achievements of actors, producers and directors presenting a more positive, diverse and progressive perspective of filmmaking.  I understand a significant and growing percentage of filmgoers in America are from minority groups so there should be some reflection of this on screen and in what the Academy considers award worthy.  It has a responsibility to be more reflective and less bias towards its telling of history, its summary of the present and its vision of the future, which half the time paints a very bleak if not non existent picture for those of a darker hue. The Academy’s issues  come as no surprise when the decision makers are predominantly white middle aged men, disengaged with a wider society.

White middle aged men, responsible for this kind of gatekeeping, equally suppress black expression and representation in UK arts. They remain gatekeepers in how particularly the western world sees itself and more importantly what it values. This isn’t a new phenomenon because, for a number of years, creative professionals from minority groups,  including musicians, performing artists, writers and painters have looked abroad for a beacon of hope and opportunity, to master their talents and feed their aspirations. As a London born artist, I have found some solace in New York, knowing there is a greater degree of support, comradery amongst peers and opportunity to work  in chosen fields, with less emphasis on colour. That’s not to say things are completely flawless however. So what is the problem with the UK? Surely there must be a limit on how many period dramas are made and writing  negative stereotypical or token roles into depressing soaps operas like EastEnders are by no means the solution.

Whilst this gatekeeping issue is a challenge and we identify culprits responsible for its maintenance, we must also hold ourselves responsible for implementing change, either through boycotting industries or being more vocal and visible in our demand for it.

I have tremendous respect and admiration for David Oyelowo, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Idris Elba and others for their success so far. They provide encouragement and hope, despite the odds, to persevere with international careers. I’m equally glad such talented people are realising they must seek opportunities wherever doors are open. Perhaps the grass is greener on the other side? I’m interested to hear others views on this matter.

http://www.theguardian.com/culture/video/2016/jan/18/idris-elba-talent-is-everywhere-opportunity-isnt-video?CMP=share_btn_link

Schomburg’s two great exhibitions on African American Theatre and AfroFuturism

As my exhibition comes to an end I’ve been taking time to check out a number of exhibitions and events currently available to see. Two very interesting exhibitions are at New York’s Schomburg Centre in Harlem.

The centre celebrates the 75th anniversary of our renowned American Negro Theatre (ANT). Known to the locals as “The Harlem Library Little Theatre,” the ANT was founded in 1940 as a community space for thespians to work in productions that illustrated the diversity of black life. This exhibition is taken entirely from the Schomburg Collections and highlights the ANT’s stage productions from 1940 through 1949 with photographs, posters, playbills, and news clippings. Images include scenes from successful plays such as Anna Lucasta, studio workshops, and radio broadcasts featuring prominent talent like Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee, Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier and Lofton Mitchell, whose careers began at the ANT.

The second show is Unveiling Visions: The Alchemy of the Black Imagination Curated by artist John Jennings and Reynaldo Anderson,this exhibition includes artifacts from the Schomburg collections that are connected to Afrofuturism, black speculative imagination and Diasporan cultural production. Offering a fresh perspective on the power of speculative imagination and the struggle for various freedoms of expression in popular culture, Unveiling Visions showcases illustrations and other graphics that highlight those popularly found in science fiction, magical realism and fantasy.

Both shows run until December 31st so if you’re in the city please visit. The exhibition galleries are open Monday – Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. For further info please visit http://www.nypl.org/events/exhibitions