In Conversation With Musician Richie Goods

Richie Goods, David Emmanuel Noel, Occhi Magazine
Photo by: Kasia Idzkowska

Richie Goods is someone who comes to mind when I think of an artist who excels in the techniques of musicianship. Possessing an extremely professional and buoyant approach to his art, Richie Goods is a celebrated bassist, bandleader, and producer, who has worked with a plethora of universally recognized acts including Whitney Houston, Christina Aguilera, and Alicia Keys.

His new album entitled  ‘My Left Hand Man’ celebrates the legacy and compositional talents of his late mentor, Mulgrew Miller.  It is an intoxicating collection of tracks that respectfully pay homage to Miller. Confidently fusing elements of jazz, blues, and funk, the album successfully delivers a broad-stroke of psychedelic sounds, solos, and memorable renditions delivered meticulously by a cohort of some of the finest musicians on the circuit. Featured artists include pianists Shedrick Mitchell and Mike King, guitarists Tariqh Akoni and David Rosenthal, Lil John Roberts on drums, vocalist Jean Baylor, vibraphonist Chien Chien Lu, and percussionist Danny Sadownick. The composition and musical arrangements are what we expect from an artist of Good’s standing, leaving it easy for me to recommend this to your record list. It was great catching up with Richie to discuss the album and his career in general. The full interview is available on the Occhi Magazine website.

Recent Music Reviews for Occhi Magazine

Hoping you’re all having a great start to the week. I thought to share links to two recent reviews I’ve written for Occhi Magazine, a great online magazine supporting the arts. ( Be sure to follow Occhi for the latest reviews, interviews and updates on all things creative and entertaining!) Two great acts have new tracks out- check out singer/ songwriter Juliana Kanyomozi ‘s new single ‘I Love You’ and the artist collective Trade Secrets new release entitled ‘True North.’

Trade Secret, David Emmanuel Noel, Occhi Magazine, Artist David Emmanuel Noel, David Emmanuel Noel interviews
Trade Secrets Euphoric Sound and Melodies Sets Sail With Their Hot New Release ‘True North
David Emmanuel Noel, Occhi Magazine, Music Reviews
Singer and Songwriter Juliana Kanyomozi Speaks of Love and Hope on Her New Single “I Love You”

Art Will Find A Way- The Latest Exhibition from the Ajags Gallery

David Emmanuel Noel, David Emmanuel Noel interviews, Mayowa Ajagunna, Ajags GalleryLast week I was in  London’s Shoreditch district admiring the various works of art on public display. Until this weekend, the Espacio Gallery plays host to the Ajags Gallery’s new exhibition entitled ‘Art Will Find A Way.’ The exhibition is a group show, comprising of the distinct and individual works of four artists – Mayowa Ajagunna (of the Ajags Gallery), Saman Gedara, Mary Osinibi and Princess Idowu – all connected by a shared interest in the wildly imaginative nature of artistic expressions (but diverse in their creativity) that includes painting, photography, sculpture, installation and mixed media.

‘Art Will Find A Way‘ is a concept that presents the idea of open-mindedness, optimism, positivity and being able to resolve or deal with whatever situation you find yourself in. The art is inspirational, thought provoking and invites you to enjoy the directness of the work.  Without doubt there are paintings some may need sensitivity in handling but this selection of work only encourages you to look at the subject matters from a wider perspective, as an active participant and not just a passive observer. With this in mind, I was particularly keen to ask the gallery’s founder Mayowa Ajagunna about his work and the show.

Q- How did you get into painting?

I didn’t get into painting. Painting was already a part of me and all I did was to show that side of me to the world.

Q-Your works appear to carry a personal, intense and intimate connection with the viewer. What motivates you to paint?

Legacy – the idea of leaving something timeless behind appeals to me a lot. Communication – its a medium I use communicate, so that I can be very well understood. Expression – as cliche as this might sound, painting when you’re angry, down, sad, stressed or worried actually elevates a problem from ones mind.

Mayowa Ajagunna

Q- How did the theme of “Art will find a way’ come about?

“Art Will Find A Way” is a quote I learnt from a friend I studied Art A levels with in college almost 15 years ago. Today I still very much believe in it because to me it reflects on everyday life struggles and having a strong mindset, discipline, focus and determination to see yourself through difficult situations.

Q-Can you tell us more about the Ajag Gallery?

Correction “Ajags Gallery” like the name says ‘Ajags Gallery’ is for all of ‘Ajags’ Artworks lol. Just like a Salvador Dali Gallery or a Picasso Gallery.

I’m not your typical high street gallery that seeks to rob artists for a 50% commission on artworks. I am an independent artist that exhibits solo. For the first time I am having a group show with other artist and its called “Art Will Find A Way.”

Q-When and where will we see the next Ajags Gallery?

Next year summer most likely, this is the first of its kind that we intend to do every year. Where exactly, well somewhere around Brick Lane, so long as it remains the contemporary art hub of London. Nigeria, Africa is also a strong possibility.

I wish Mayowa and his colleagues the very best with the show. I encourage you to see this if you are in London over the next week. For further information please visit the http://www.ajagsgallery.com

‘She Has a Name’ illustrates film making with a great purpose.

She Has a Name, the 2016 Canadian drama by the Kooman brothers, was released in the UK this month and will be shown at selected cinemas across the country during the coming weeks. The film’s primary focus is the harrowing story of two young girls who become victims of trafficking in Thailand. The film highlights the level of human trafficking, the height of corruption and the power businessmen yield from such a despicable activity. Please click on the link to read my review  of the film for Occhi Magazine.

 

Make Space for ‘Black Space’

This week I had the pleasure to meet artist Jon Daniel at the launch of his latest exhibition entitled ’Black Space.’ The show is small collection of iconographic poster artworks celebrating black screen heroines and heroes from the world of Sci-Fi.

Science Fiction is a very interesting genre, particularly when a majority of big budget movie blockbusters throughout the years have depicted a rather morbid and apocalyptic future, where people of the African diaspora are near extinction or only represented by one supporting character. I guess the same can be said of many genres including historical epics such as Cleopatra or the recent Gods of Egypt. It was refreshing see a show celebrating iconic figures such as Star Trek’s Lieutenant Uhura and Morpheus from the Matrix Trilogy. My only disappointment was the limited number of works displayed.

I have noticed and welcome the growing popularity of Afrofuturism and Jon Daniel, the man behind the Afro Supa Hero collection, contributes to this comprehensively. Classically trained as a graphic designer, Jon has worked largely as an art director for a number of London’s leading advertising agencies. He has also co-founded two creative companies -Headland, a creative partnership and ebb&flow®, a boutique branding company creating work for a range of corporate, cultural and public sector clients. The artist has created a reputation in the cultural arena. This is includes curating “Post-Colonial: Stamps from the African Diaspora” and “JA50” exhibitions with global stamp emporium, Stanley Gibbons. His exhibition ‘Afro Supa Hero’, based on his personal collection of black action figures and comic books exhibited at the V&A Museum of Childhood in 2014.

Black Space runs from today to October 31st at Upstairs At the Ritzy, Brixton, London SW2. Check it out if you’re in the vicinity. For more info on the artist visit https://twitter.com/jondaniel66

Black Space by artist artist Jon Daniel
Black Space by artist artist Jon Daniel

TED Talks: An Artist’s Unflinching Look at Racial Violence

A fellow artist and friend kindly forwarded this TED video featuring conceptual artist Sanford Biggers.  I thought to share it. The artist uses painting, sculpture, video and performance to spark challenging conversations about the history and trauma of black America. He details two compelling works and shares the motivation behind his art. “Only through more thoughtful dialogue about history and race can we evolve as individuals and society,” Biggers says.

 

Artist Fae Simon – Future Projects, Diversity in the Arts and her album entitled Outrospective

A few years ago I had the pleasure to blog about the very talented Fae Simon, whose track ‘New Londinium’ featured on my video Let’s Jam. We caught up recently to discuss her music, her career to date and future projects we can all look forward to knowing more about.

Q- Since your debut album ‘Melodrama’ you’ve been extremely busy touring and collaborating with various artist. What’s the theme and general inspiration for your second album?

FS- My inspiration for Outrospective was my observations of all the people I encountered while on tour with Yarah Bravo & Jehst. I saw first hand the true power of music in action; as it didn’t matter wherever we went and performed the love of music unified us all. It is also a critique of my environment, as I believe it is the responsibility of all good creatives to do so, and to try and affect change though our art.

For example, ‘Running’ is dedicated to Mark Duggan and the residents of Tottenham, following his death and the subsequent riots. I was actually stuck in the studio for 5 days unable to get home, as they’d blocked off the whole of Tottenham High Road, so it allowed me to reflect on the situation and write the song for the album.

Q- Has this album been easier to produce?

FS- No, not at all. Besides personal issues I had during the creation of the album, I had some unforeseeable and predictable obstacles to hurdle to complete it.

It was more stressful trying to get the administration of the initial collaborations finalised than actually writing and creating the music. I had to re-record some tracks with the band but they were the most fun to do and nothing can touch the sound and feeling of live music, so it worked out as it was supposed to.

 

Fae Simon - The One That Got Away Remixes
Fae Simon – The One That Got Away Remixes

Q- You’re a multi-disciplined artist. Apart from promoting the new album, what else does the immediate future hold for you?

FS- my new single ‘The One That Got Away’ is due for release in April, produced by CloudFistConceptz, with remixes by DJ Raw Sugar, Shaun Ashby & Beyond Tone. The video is due for release in 2wks, directed by Chiba Visuals.

I am making my acting debut on March 19th at the University of West London for national storytelling week, in a production called ‘Soweto Voices’. It’s raising awareness of Apartheid and celebrating South African culture.

The cast are all 25 and under, so I’m the only artist/tutor who also gets to perform, so I’m extremely excited, having studied drama from GCSE to degree, and this being my first professional drama production.

I am also raising my fine art profile this year. I have been commissioned for murals and exhibited in London, New York and Berlin, so I know I have a market, I just need to build my portfolio this year. I have been offered an exhibition in Copenhagen with a certain amazing fine artist called David Emmanuel, so I should be ready to take on the art world by then.

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Q- Yes, the Scandinavian connection is still in the making! lol You’ve spent time in Germany, amongst other places recently. In light of the very public discussion over a lack of diversity in the arts, do you have any particular views or experiences that support a call for a greater degree of representation? 

FS – I think all people who are of an ethnic background who live and work in the West feel underrepresented.

Of course that is something that needs to be addressed, as only last week, for the first time in a long time, there was a black family in anadvert (I believe it’s the new Samsung ad) and other black people noticed enough for them to comment.

It’s a sad state of affairs when that is a noticeably surprising occurrence on television in the 21st century, so how can we be too surprised when no black actors or directors are nominated for Oscars?

I think it was last year or the year before there was public outrage when Viola Davis was called “not classically beautiful”, as opposed to Kerry Washington. Both beautiful black protagonists in major US dramas, but I guess Viola’s features were considered too classically African to be classically beautiful?

As someone who studied dance and drama to degree level, I was very much used to being the token representative for my whole race in a lot of circumstances; or the class or project would reflect the country on a microcosmic ethnic level. It amused me, as stereotypically black people are artistically creative, yet I would always be 1 of 1 or 1 of 3 – from the age of 8-21.

Since I was a child representation has meagrely improved, or is still prejudiced to the point of subliminal, (i.e. Zayn Malik’s Pillowtalk video) so we can only continue to take a stand, make some noise and continually voice the injustice or our silence will be misconstrued as acceptance.

For further information check the following links

Outrospective Album Download Link:
http://www.bbemusic.com/data.pl?release=BBE289ADG#.Vmr3pMlFDqC

Magic City Video:
http://youtu.be/rqa-3Irordc

Fae Simon on Facebook

Fae Simon on Twitter