Release of CD-‘Pictures At An African Exhibition’

David Emmanuel NoelThe result of my collaboration with Darryl Yokley is released this April 20th and all involved are excited with up and coming performances and promotional events in New York and beyond. Keep an eye out on Darryl’s website for updates. I hope to see some of you at these gigs! The first single ‘Ubuntu’ will be streaming on band camp. You can download the single by visiting this link and pre-ordering a physical or digital copy of the album. Wishing you a great day!

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My Latest Show- Unfold at London’s Espacio Art Gallery

David Emmanuel Noel
Figurine 3- Acrylic on canvas

Hoping you’re all well and the year is being good to you so far. I’m happy to announce that I’m participating in Unfold, the forthcoming exhibition at London’s Espacio Gallery. I’ll be exhibiting some of my recent figurative work which I hope you’ll like. The exhibition  is a fascinating journey into the creative mind of several artists. It reveals the creative processes that are essential to the development of their art. They allow the viewer a glimpse into sources of inspiration, and invite the onlooker to watch their ideas unfold, evolve and eventually develop into finished works.

The exhibition, curated by Carlos de Lins,  showcases a variety of interpretations and mediums reflecting their different styles. The private viewing is on Thursday 1st February. The show runs from January 30th to February 11th 2018.

Featured artists are:

Tanaz Assefi, Elena Brand, Andrea Coltman, Evaldas Gulbinas, Ekaterini Koliakou, Charvi Jain, Benjamin Nyari, Renee Rilexie, Pierre Verluca, Claire Weinstock, Sara Wickenden, Lewis Albert Williams

For further info please visit the gallery website.

 

Around the World in 80 Washing Lines, with artist Mahlia Amatina

This week I had the pleasure to  meet conceptual abstract artist Mahlia Amatina at the Menier Gallery near London Bridge. Until this weekend, you’re invited to visit Around the World in 80 Washing Lines, an interactive autism-friendly art exhibition depicting unique washing lines across the globe. The exhibition will tour both galleries and launderettes in the South of England, inviting visitors to discover the story behind each garment and washing line. The exhibition will also feature free, educational workshops for primary school children.

Around the World in 80 Washing Lines explores the connections and similarities of each washing line using a combination of photographs, textiles and a multi-sensory catalogue of effects including touch, smell and sound. Artist Malia Amatina explains the reason behind the project; “The project started as a means to highlight similarities between us as human beings, in a world where we often focus on differences. The universal washing line is a perfect means to do this: we all have laundry to do; irrespective of who, what or where we are in the world.”

Visitors can interact with each installation of clothes and get a glimpse of the person behind the garment by reading a short blog with real quotations. The exhibition reaches out to a wide and diverse audience, including those suffering with autism, alongside those to whom art is not fully accessible. As an autistic artist, Mahlia is keen to create an exhibition that is appealing and available to those across the spectrum. The campaign has already gained fantastic acknowledgment thus far having been recognised for its charitable efforts by the prestigious Arts Council, receiving funding earlier this year. The project has also recently been backed by The National Autistic Society.

For further information about the Around the World in 80 Washing Lines exhibition or Mahlia Amatina’s artwork please get in touch with Mahlia Amatina on mahliaamatina@gmail.com or 07725 366966, or Jessica Alley at Little Red Rooster on jessica@littleredrooster.co.uk or on 07506756914.

Featured Artist: In Conversation with Duane Eubanks

One thing I love about New York is the number of talented artists it hosts, particularly jazz musicians of pure quality and depth. One of these is Philadelphia’s Duane Eubanks, an extraordinarily talented jazz trumpeter, composer, arranger, producer and recent recipient of the Philadelphia Education Fund EDDY Award.

Duane Eubanks

Knowing he has also performed with mutual friends, I’ve been following his career and have the pleasure of owning his albums “Things of that Particular Nature (2015-Sunnyside) and “DE3-Live at Maxwell’s (2016-Sunnyside). I recently had the pleasure and honour to speak to him about his career to date and what’s next on the horizon.

One of the questions artists are asked is how they chose their medium but we already know it’s in your blood; Your mother is pianist Vera Eubanks and your brothers are celebrated trombonist Robin Eubanks and guitarist Kevin Eubanks. I guess my first question is why did you choose the trumpet over any other instrument? 

I have a twin brother, Shane…  He and I began playing music at the same time. Our brother, Kevin, played trumpet before he played guitar. Robin has always played Trombone. My twin is taller than me by 6 inches, our brothers had old instruments at home so, when it was time to choose instruments, Shane got the longer instrument (the trombone) and I got the shorter instrument – trumpet.  I think each instrument has a certain personality that relates to prospective musicians that play them. I feel a special connection to the trumpet. My height was a plus in this situation.

You decided to read business at the University of Maryland. Did you always see yourself becoming a musician and was that choice purely for academic merits? 

I studied Business in college because I was fairly good at maths and was impressed by my dad’s corporate dealings and the level of stability with which he lived his life.  I was very confused about being a musician when I entered college. I wasn’t even playing when I entered college. I had my years of teenage rebellion and I stopped playing for 6 years (14-20).  I missed the very formative years so I had to work really hard to get my playing on a certain level.  My brother, Shane, convinced me to join the school band and I became obsessed with the instrument and thus a change of heart in terms of my lifelong ambitions.

Describe your experience studying jazz at Temple University with Dr Billy Taylor and subsequently working with Mulgrew Miller’s Wingspan? 

My time at Temple was specifically an attempt to prepare myself for my move to New York.  I wanted to be on a certain musical level before I made the move. Temple University awarded me the time to learn and practice. It also awarded me the opportunities to meet and perform, through master classes, with Dr. Billy Taylor and Wynton Marsalis.

I had the absolute honour to perform with the great Mulgrew Miller. I was a member of his band, Wingspan, for ten years. Words cannot express the gratitude I have for Mulgrew taking me under his wing. I grew immensely from this experience and learned in abundance about the realities involved in being a musician, bandleader, and I got to witness, first hand, a genius at work and how he carried himself as a human being. It was a blessing that has shaped me as a musician and I will NEVER forget the experience or him.

You are a recipient of the Philadelphia Education Fund EDDY Award. Can you explain the initiative/award further and the importance music education plays in furthering the careers of young musicians? 

The Philadelphia Education Fund stands very firmly for all aspects dealing with high quality education. They are advocates for quality teachers, quality learning environments and the overall quality of students’ learning experience.

I received an EDDY award as an advocate for education. It was an honour to be chosen along with my brothers, Robin and Kevin, to receive this education award. Education is the key to our nation’s future. I have accepted the responsibility to share the information that I have gained through my years of experience to ensure the proper information is passed in order to sustain the high level of the music that I love. The generations before me did the same so I could learn. Prospective musicians have a right and a responsibility to learn and those with the experience have a responsibility to share/teach. I, personally, put the responsibility on both student and teacher.

That’s very admirable and congratulations on receiving the award. I’ve heard American jazz artist talk about the popularity of the genre declining but surely this isn’t the case? Moreover, jazz continues to be very popular globally. What’s your view? 

I think the popularity of jazz will always be an issue being discussed. Many have no idea that jazz WAS the popular music in the early part of the century. It has lost its place in popular music but is still very relevant to a number of people. If it wasn’t , there wouldn’t be so many musicians trying to learn the art form.  In Europe, where I think cultural values and advances are praised, supported, and upheld, communities have far more access to things of artistic expression (music, art, literature, etc.) I don’t see that kind of dedication to the uplifting of the minds of the American people. Jazz music gives the listener the opportunity to open their minds, think freely, and absorb a different approach to a general situation. The emphasis on the importance of the arts has been gravely overlooked. I think it’s hindering the advancement, exposure, and the quality of the arts and society as a whole.

To date, not only have you worked in jazz but across many genres, at many venues and with a number of notable artists. What has been the highlight of your career to date and why? 

I am extremely proud of the fact that I have worked in many different genres of music in many different settings. I think it is very important for musicians to keep an open mind when it comes to crossing genres when performing. It allows you to grow as an artist and opens yourself to prospective fans of your craft. I have to say that working with the legendary Elvin Jones would have to be at the top of the list. I constantly thank my man, Bassist, Gerald Cannon for making it possible for me to be a part of Elvin’s band. I still wear the shirts we had to wear.  I got to witness, first hand, the spiritual element of the music. I guess it was easy for him from playing so many years with John Coltrane, but it was an awesome experience to watch him play his heart and soul every night on every tune.  It made me aware of the fact that music is spirit and the lack of it in today’s artists.

Who is at the top of your list to work with next if you’re given the opportunity? 

Work with next? I have ALWAYS been on a mission to learn as much as possible from my predecessors. I have a list of guys in mind…. George Cables, Victor Lewis, Billy Hart, Harold Mabern, to name a few. I have worked with Dave Holland’s Big Band. I would love to experience that again and would embrace the opportunity to do a smaller group with him. I would also like to do a something different like 3 trumpets with incredible talents that walk with humility (no ego – I can’t do egos, especially trumpet egos) perhaps Josh Evans and Roy Hargrove… that would be fun.

I forgot to add, working with my brothers Robin and Kevin. I think that is something not only I would look forward to but many in the industry as well. Also Roy Haynes!! The thing about music is that there are plenty of ways to learn, people to learn from and plenty of music to make.

Following the successful release of ‘DE3: Live at Maxwells’ and ‘Things of that Particular Nature’ when should we expect another album? 

I am very proud of my latest releases. They were well received and a lot of fun to produce. They were much needed learning experiences.  You can expect something in 2018. I am performing a weekend at Smalls December 15 & 16. These dates may become commercially released performances.

Are you happy to share anything else currently in the pipeline?

Someone very wise and very close to me advised me not to share everything that I was up to.  While you are working out your plans, someone has already implemented them.  I am working on music for a number of recording ideas. One specific recording project I am really excited about. Everyone will know when things get put into motion. I now realize the importance of being creative when promoting myself. That being said, we did a mini documentary with the intention to draw some attention to my willingness to teach. This mini documentary has been accepted by a few independent film festivals. In general, keep your ears open for future recording projects. They are coming!

I look forward to witnessing more from Duane and wish him the very best with his career. For further information please visit his website. www.DuaneEubanks.com

Pictures at an African Art Exhibition – Collaboration with Darryl Yokley

Hoping you all have an enjoyable and memorable weekend. Please see attached the first video promoting ‘Pictures at an African Art Exhibition’ – my enjoyable collaboration with the very talented Darryl Yokley and his band Sound Reformation. This is their second album which will be released later this year. The video features work related to, inspired by and created for the album and associated events. Stay tuned for further information. Have a good day!

You Are Enough – Thoughts on the Public Art Project by Neequaye Dreph Dsane

A colleague was kind enough to forward me the attached link on a project featuring the work of artist Neequaye Dreph Dsane. This British-Ghanaian artist is painting huge, beautiful murals of ordinary black women on London’s streets. Please take a look.

Unfortunately, despite the quality of art, I’ve found the subject of painting only black women is making headlines for the wrong reasons. It seems Dreph‘s work has come under scrutiny with claims on social media that the work is racist and unnecessary in a modern society. I disagree entirely with those who feel such work in the public realm is wrong and I would champion  other underrepresented groups to do the same, provided it is executed with the aim of creating aesthetically pleasing, therapeutic and social benefits to public spaces . There are many artists painting work which is publicly displayed that does not include people of colour but I wouldn’t claim such work to be racist. However, maybe I should?

Disappointingly, some people remain ignorant and naive regarding the disproportional levels of black female representation in the media and have not questioned the mechanisms that sustain this flaw. The artist’s work appears to address this and balance an issue that undermines the very idea of equality or equal representation in a modern democratised society. He is celebrating his cultural heritage proudly as he should. When we explore mainstream art and media, we should note that the most underrepresented groups of people are black women and the physically disabled. You just have to look at British television to see that the representation is still falling short and its depiction of BMEs remains stereotypical in the main. In modern British society, the depiction of people of colour, their cultures and contributions remain marginalised or even trivialised.

Most art galleries in art hubs in cities such as London and New York are primarily owned or managed by white proprietors. The feeling amongst many groups is they tend to showcase work by white or European artists for predominantly white audiences. Perhaps this perception is wrong but it remains a perception. Yes, there are shows and exhibitions that showcase the work of other demographics and prominent artists of colour but are these isolated cases, where the decisions to exhibit are linked to minimal levels of financial risk for curators, galleries or museums with expected commercial returns? This I guess is a reflection of the sector, its market and interest of those investing in art, which is something I’d like to address later.

Black women on our screens, magazines and billboards may have improved over the last twenty years, just like employment figures, but significant steps towards change must be made. In this day and age, it is disappointing to know that significant players, for example in advertising and media, feel certain ‘looks’ and ‘features’ don’t sell or exhibit the wrong image unless you’ve got the ‘Beyonce or Rihanna look’ which is seen as more palatable. If people in positions of authority are able to reflect society, exhibit a broader church of representation, to celebrate differences and embrace ‘multiculturalism’ we wouldn’t need to go down this road of discussion. Such excellent work, like others around London would be seen for what they are-  works of art! However, as it is art so it will also provoke discussion, like, dislike and controversy. If anyone feels voiceless and underrepresented, is it right to ignore it and wrong to challenge it?

Whilst I’ve focused on the wrongs of some who contribute to the status quo, the blame cannot lay solely with them. Disenfranchised groups and communities who do not see a balance of representation must address this by investing in, championing and promoting art that reflects them. Moving forward, if they do not see it, like Dreph, they must support and independently create platforms which allow them to. This includes art on our streets, buildings and anywhere within the public realm, bringing art to the masses. There are some things you will not value if you cannot see. Moreover, there are some things others will not value until they see more of it. In conclusion, this isn’t so much about Dreph’s choice of subject but more a reflection of how damaged our society is and what we must do collectively to fix it. What do you think? I’d be happy to hear views and opinions.

For further information on Neequaye Dreph Dsane please visit http://dreph.co.uk