The Fusion Series

Hi all! So we’re into the final month of the year. What a year it’s been! As we wind down for the year end holidays I’m continuing to work on new material, including the Fusion series. The work is an experimentation of colour, using a variety of acrylic paints and ink. In recent years there has been a growing acceptance that the healthcare environment can have a significant impact on a patient’s perception of their medical care and, in some cases, on their actual recovery. Health professionals explore the psychology of colour and how well-chosen hues on walls, floors and furniture can have a positive, or indeed negative, effect on a person’s health and wellbeing. The viewer is also encouraged to think about the relationships between tones and textures in paintings , how they provoke emotions and contribute to the therapeutic impact of colour.

Wishing you a great day!

Advertisements

‘Pictures at an African Exhibition’ at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Illustration by Nate Harris
Illustration by Nate Harris

Wishing you all a great weekend ahead. I hope it’s both a relaxing and enjoyable one! For those in or planning a trip to Philadelphia next weekend, please visit the Museum of Art. I’m happy to announce my art will once again be exhibited and accompany a one-night performance by Darryl Yokley’s Sound Reformation, as part of the Pictures at an African Exhibition promotion. This event forms part of the Museum’s successful Friday Nights calendar. Performances on Friday 16thNovember are at 5.45 and 7.15pm in the Great Stair Hall. Please visit the Philadelphia Museum of Art for further information. For further info on Darryl, the album and artwork please visit darrylyokley.com Have a great day!

African and Diaporan Voices on African Architecture 

During the UK Black History month of October, I’m privileged once again to introduce another guest blog by fellow creative Livingstone Mukusa on his current project celebrating African architects and architecture.

People, locale, environment. These components of a landscape are interrelated, and in the hands of a sensitive practitioner, are approached collectively when considering design intervention. In Sub Saharan Africa, however, this is the exception, rather than the rule.

Colonialism introduced to Sub Saharan Africa new means of construction and building aesthetics. Dominated by industrialized, mass produced materials, this new architectural language spread, permeating rapidly through previously distinct architectural landscapes to creating a region replete with architectural expressions reduced to basic physical attributes that are divorced from their environments, and social meaning of those who inhabit them.

Traditionally, African architecture, much like its art, has always been a verb rather than a noun. It was a language of ritual rather than objectification, a language of climactic response, a language of resource availability.

Patterns, tessellations, fractal designs, and numerous other elements were generally not for the embellishment and decoration that ordinarily meets today’s eye, but carried with them specific meaning and purpose. While the Western tradition of compartmentalized knowledge, combined with the modernist concept of the exploration of each medium in isolation, led to a virtually complete separation of art and architecture. The integration of art or craft and architecture, on the other hand, was and remains an essential part indigenous African cultures— a result of the experience of unity between art and life.

Today, architecture throughout Sub Saharan Africa, and its Diaspora is more of a testament to expressions and materiality borrowed from elsewhere. Occasionally, a nod or two is given to the locality and culture, forms and techniques that speak of the place and the people. Where does this place the idea of an African Architecture? In our attempts to frame, within a modern day context, what African architecture is, how can we bridge the huge chasm of a dichotomy between African architecture of old and new African architectural expressions? What frames African architecture? Should it even be framed?

Sub-Saharan Africa is incredibly diverse in landscape, climate zones, ethnicities, cultures, and economies. And the answers to these questions are as complex, contradictory even, as this diversity. But these are questions worth examining. To this end, I am seeking an assortment of UK and Europe based architects, artists, activists and scholars to lend their thoughts for an upcoming publication.

Interested parties please contact the author.

Livingstone Mukasa

Livingstone Mukasa, founder of Afritecture, a blog focused on the contextual engagement, and exploration of the African vernacular in modern architecture. He can be reached with Twitter: @livmuk, or email: mukasa@yahoo.com

In Conversation with Artist Amber Henry

Amber Henry

It’s always such a pleasure to meet inspiring artists and be exposed to their wonderful work.  Amber Henry is one of those artists who, aside from being an excellent painter, has highly admirable aspirations to assist charities and agencies supporting those affected by cancer. A former Laguna Beach gallery owner, she relocated from Southern California to Salt Lake City in 2011 to take care of her mother who was suffering from breast cancer.

Amber graduated from Laguna College of Art + Design with a BFA in Fine Arts and Illustration. She went on to show in local Laguna art galleries such as Fingerhut and Orange County Creatives. While in California, she was a leader in the Laguna Beach art community, served on various committees such as First Thursday’s Art Walk, and Laguna College of Art + Design’s mentoring and alumni committees. She recently featured in a solo exhibition at Alpine Art Gallery in Salt Lake City. Amber kindly agreed to talk further about her art, career and future objectives.

I love your artwork. What’s your story and how did you become an artist?

I have always been consumed by imagination and creativity. Wandering, wondering, sensitive to unique patterns in everything and the many levels of colour and beauty these created. As long as I can remember, unique stories and ideas would play out within my imagination. It was as though these stories were so real I could reach out and touch them. As the creative environment travelled with me, so did my crayons, markers, pencils and torn pieces of paper. My pockets would overflow with drawing utensils and various “fascinating” objects which had been collected throughout the day. At one point, the discovery that I could create a world with paint and canvas lead to the realization that art has always lived within me and that I was destined to share this with the world and make my impression.

Do you specialize in portraits or do you work on different commissions?

Though I am passionate about portrait painting, I have and will work on any custom art. I tend to pour my soul in whatever I do, so creating custom art that will make a deep impact on anyone viewing the art, is an important to me and a large part of what I do. All of my art must evoke some sort of experience in the emotional sense. Otherwise, I feel as though my work is not complete.

I had the privilege of first seeing your work via Twitter. Can you provide further insight on how you managed to develop a theme of patient portraits?

I feel that people make an impression on the world. Every crease, wrinkle, scar and expression, tells a story and reveals pieces of a unique journey. Eyes reflect all kinds of emotion, from love, joy, pain, passion, and in many cases more than we can ever fathom. For me, to tell a story is to create a portrait and capture every one of those details in that moment. Storytelling in a single moment in time. A moment that can appear to be only what you see on the surface, yet gives a glimpse into what lies beneath the surface. I want my art to inspire people to use their imagination to interpret a particular piece and its story.
It all began with a portrait of my mother who passed away of cancer. I used this as healing process for myself. I wanted to capture the inner light and positive outlook she most often carried. From there, my hope was to capture likeness in a deeper sense. Yes, likeness can be captured by the artist in the physical sense. One can take a photo of a person and create a version that looks just like the person on the outside, but how many are able to successfully capture the inner person as well? It is the little nuances that matter. A certain depth and twinkle in the eye, a slight turn of the mouth, an eyebrow raised slightly higher than the other.

Amber Henry, David Emmanuel Noel
Mom- Portrait by Amber Henry

I don’t wish to only go skin deep when painting people. Capturing the soul is what I strive for whether it be painting a portrait of someone who has passed or one that is still physically with us.

An impression of the soul and capturing that moment in time…the essence of a person.

Are there any charities or agencies you would like to work with to develop this project further?

I would love to work with any non-profit organizations which promote healing for those affected by cancer in some way, survivors, caregivers and family of those afflicted. Currently, I am looking to raise money larger organizations like Komen as well as smaller, community based non-profits. Since giving back is such a big part of what I am trying to do, for those who mention this interview when ordering any of my artwork, I will donate 25% of the proceeds to a charity such as Komen or one of their choosing.

Amber Henry, David Emmanuel Noel
“Hands of Love”, charcoal and pastel drawing on paper, 17.5″ x 12″ (commissioned art) *A wife’s loving hand with the hand of her dying husband.

Progress has been made in how the health sector uses art as part of the healing process. Do you have any ideas how this can be furthered?

I’m no doctor, but I believe that by raising awareness on how utilizing the arts can promote healing and can bring hope and joy to so many. There is so much focus on treatments in the physical sense, like chemo, radiation and nutrition, and exercise. What about the fine arts, music and dance? Even if it provides a creative distraction from whatever treatment a person is going through, I do believe our emotional health and personal fulfilment directly reflects our outlook and physical wellbeing. If someone can get lost in imagining the story behind a piece of my art, it’s certainly better than thinking about their battle with whatever illness or challenge they are facing. I believe anyone affected by any sort of physical challenge can be positively uplifted by creativity whether it is through their own, or experiencing and enjoying the creativity of others.

Seth

What other projects and activities should we look out for?

I’d like to further examine people. People affected by a variety circumstances, like homelessness, poverty, etc. Based on their story, I would paint them, striving to re-create the moment in time in which their story was told. Even if is a painting of a space with no people, this would reflect a specific experience or story told.

 

 

I wish Amber the very best for the future. For further info Amber can be contacted via the following links

mailto:akhenryfinearts@gmail.com

www.akhenryfinearts.com 

Facebook: AKHenry Fine Arts 

Twitter: @akhenryfinearts 

 

 

 

Recent Music Reviews for Occhi Magazine

Hoping you’re all having a great start to the week. I thought to share links to two recent reviews I’ve written for Occhi Magazine, a great online magazine supporting the arts. ( Be sure to follow Occhi for the latest reviews, interviews and updates on all things creative and entertaining!) Two great acts have new tracks out- check out singer/ songwriter Juliana Kanyomozi ‘s new single ‘I Love You’ and the artist collective Trade Secrets new release entitled ‘True North.’

Trade Secret, David Emmanuel Noel, Occhi Magazine, Artist David Emmanuel Noel, David Emmanuel Noel interviews
Trade Secrets Euphoric Sound and Melodies Sets Sail With Their Hot New Release ‘True North
David Emmanuel Noel, Occhi Magazine, Music Reviews
Singer and Songwriter Juliana Kanyomozi Speaks of Love and Hope on Her New Single “I Love You”

It’s August already!

David Emmanuel Noel, Art by David Emmanuel Noel, Jazz & Art, Pictures at an African Exhibition, Darryl YokleyIt’s August already! The year seems to be flying by. The summer has been a mixed bag of events but it’s also been a period visiting galleries, gaining inspiration and working on a few pieces including the musical themed works above. Part of my ‘art of music‘ collection. This follows  the recent work with Darryl Yokley on ‘Pictures at an African Exhibition.’  Please visit Darryl’s site for the CD and further details. I’m looking forward to sharing a wider spectrum of work with you over the coming months. So, for the time being, just keeping up appearances and reaching out! Wishing you and yours a happy, healthy and relaxing month ahead.

david emmanuel noel, art of music, music and art, david emmanuel noel art, music and art

 

Radical Women: Latin American Art at The Brooklyn Museum.

Good to see New York’s weather returning to what we expect from the summer months. Last week, I was fortunate to visit Brooklyn Art Museum to see Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960- 1985.

The show is organised by the Hammer Museum LA as part of a wider initiative supported by the Getty Foundation, Ford Foundation, Bank of America and the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York amongst others. The Brooklyn Presentation is curated by Catherine Morris, for the Elizabeth A Sackler Centre for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum.

Marcia Schvartz – Les veines:Las vecinas (The Neighbours)

The show presents the work of more than 120 women artists and collectives active in Latin America and the United States during a period in the history of Americas and the development of contemporary art. The artists come from fifteen countries and include emblematic figures as well as significant, if lesser known, contemporaries. The exhibition illustrates an amalgam of radical and feminist art practices both in Latin America and among artists in the United States.

For women artists in Latin America, the decades covered by the exhibition were a time of repression as well as liberation. Most countries in the region were ruled by dictatorships or embroiled in civil war during these years. The lives of many of the featured artists were entangled with experiences of authoritarianism, imprisonment, exile, torture, violence or censorship.

There are many works to see, including ‘ The Neighbours’ by Marcia Schvartz’s and photography by Switz born Claudia Andujar. In 1971 Andujar began photographing the indigenous Yanomani community, leaving Sao Paulo to live in the states of Roraima and Amazonas. The dictatorship dispatched officials to force her to leave such rural communities in an attempt to halt the spread of images illustrating the then government’s encroachment on indigenous life.

Horizontal 2, From the Series Marcados (1983)

The show is truly a remarkable collection of work, allowing visitors to capture the  minds of inspiring  and pioneering artists.  The show runs until July 22nd  so if you’re in town pop in and see it!  For further info please visit https://www.brooklynmuseum.org